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Jelgava Palace, Jelgavas pils, Latvijas Lauksaimniecības universitāte, Jelgava, Pils

Jelgava Palace

Code: V-1072-20
Author: Aivars Gulbis
Photo taken on June 13, 2020
FREE 1000 x 667 px
72 dpi
214 KB
S 1748 x 1165 px
14.8 x 9.87 cm / 300 dpi
MB
M 3000 x 2000 px
25.4 x 16.93 cm / 300 dpi
L 6000 x 4000 px
50.8 x 33.87 cm / 300 dpi
19.2 MB

www.zudusilatvija.lv

Jelgava Palace- former residence of Courland and Zemgale dukes, now- the house of Latvia University of Agriculture. Jelgava Palace is the largest Baroque style palace in the Baltic states, the greatest work of famous Russian court architect Bartolomeo Rastrelli and one of the few cultural monuments remained in Jelgava.

The palace has 674 windows, 615 doors, 669 rooms and 25 chimneys on the roof. The palace construction was done in two periods: 1738-1740 un 1762-1772 and it was built to replace the former 14th century Order of Livonia Castle.

The castle has burnt several times with the worst damage suffered during The World War Two, when at the end of the July 1944, the castle was burned down and the Jelgava Academy of Agriculture ceased to exist. In 1956 the renovation of the Jelgava Palace started and gradually Academy of the Agriculture returned to its former location.

Today, Jelgava Palace houses the third largest university of Latvia - LLU and Jelgava city is home for 7000 students.

Since 1968 there is a museum in Jelgava Palace. The exhibition reflects the history of Order of Livonia Castle (13th century), the building process of Jelgava palace and interesting facts about historical research and maintenance of the palace.

Hot Chocolate in Duke's Residence
Jelgava Palace will not only entertain you with stories about dukes of Courland and Semigallia, but will also take you on a special taste adventure - Food of the Gods - have some hot chocolate in the company of court ladies.
Already in the 18th century hot chocolate drink was enjoyed in all European royal houses, also in Mītava.

The 21st century recipe of hot chocolate was invented by the Faculty of Food Technology of the Latvian University of Agriculture. Enjoying the chocolate visitors can also learn the secrets of construction of the largest Baltic Baroque palace, find out more about the daily life of dukes, as well as listen to breath-taking adventures of students.
Taste the sweet offer of Jelgava Palace together with family, friends or colleagues!
Price - EUR 5.00 EUR per person. (Offer available to groups of at least 20 persons.)
To taste our special chocolate please call +371 63005617, muzejs@llu.lv  

Love letters form Dorothea
New offer at the Castle - Dorothea's Love Letter Workshop. It is an educational programme for all ages, where Princess Dorothea of Courland and Zemgale will help guests create the atmosphere of the 19th century, explore the secrets of calligraphy and prepare a surprise for their loved ones by sending a letter written in Jelgava Palace in candlelight and sealed with the special seal lacquer. You can also write a letter to Dorothea, who will respond personally and give advice to questions concerning love.
Price - 5.00 EUR per person. (Offer available to groups of at least 15 persons.)
Please apply for the programme at least three days in advance calling +371 63005617 or sending an e-mail to muzejs@llu.lv .

Working hours
May 2 - August 31:
Monday - Friday: 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday: 09:00- 18:00
Sunday: 11:00 - 16:00
September 1 - April 30:
Monday - Friday: 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday, Sunday - closed*

To arrange a visit to Jelgava Palace outside the working hours please contact Ginta Linīte, museum manager at +371 63005617 or muzejs@llu.lv at least a week in advance.

Prices
May 2 - August 31:
Adults - 2.00 EUR
Pupils, students - 1.00 EUR     
September 1 - April 30:
Admission by donation
visit.jelgava.lv

Jelgava Palace (Latvian: Jelgavas pils) or historically Mitau Palace (Latvian: Mītavas pils, German: Schloss Mitau) is the largest Baroque-style palace in the Baltic states. It was built in the 18th century based on the design of Bartolomeo Rastrelli as a residence for the Dukes of Courland in their capital of Mitau (today's Jelgava, Latvia). The Dukes of Courland also had a summer palace by Rastrelli, about 40 kilometers to the southeast, called Rundāle Palace.

History
Construction of the palace started in 1738 on an island between the Lielupe river and its branches. The site had borne the residence of the former Courland dukes of the Kettler dynasty and, before that, a medieval castle belonging to the Livonian Order.

Following Ernst Johann von Biron's fall from grace in 1740, all construction work was stopped, even though the roof of the palace had not yet been completed. Most of the building materials and interior elements were moved to St. Petersburg where Rastrelli used them in building of other palaces. Work resumed after Biron's return from exile in 1762. However due to financial difficulties duke moved into palace only in 1772 although interior decorations still was in progress in many rooms. Besides Rastrelli (who, with the death of his patroness, the Empress Elizabeth, lost business in Saint Petersburg), Danish architect Severin Jensen participated in the project, giving the palace a touch of classicism.

After construction was completed in 1772, the duke lived in the palace for six months. In 1779, his successor, Peter von Biron, hosted the famous adventurer Alessandro Cagliostro in the palace. In 1788 part of the palace was damaged by fire.

After Courland was absorbed by the Russian Empire in 1795, the palace served as a refuge for French royalty fleeing the French revolution. Louis XVIII of France and his family lived in the palace between 1798 and 1800.[4] It was here that Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte of France married Louis-Antoine, Duke of Angoulême, in 1799. Later, Louis lived incognito at the palace from 1804 until 1807. French royalty attempted to recreate the court life of Versailles at Jelgava, where many old courtiers still lived, re-establishing all the court ceremonies, including the lever and coucher (ceremonies that accompanied waking and bedding, respectively)

In the beginning of 19th. century, the palace became residence of the Governor-General of Courland Governorate. For a short time in 1812, after Napoleon's invasion of Russia, the palace housed a government of the restored Duchy of Courland and Semigallia, led by Count von Medem. After the Napoleonic Wars, the palace again was occupied by the administration of the Governorate of Courland, which was situated there until 1915. In 1815, the northern part of the palace was again damaged by fire.

The interior decorations of the palace were destroyed in 1919 when the palace was looted and burned by the retreating West Russian Volunteer Army under the command of Pavel Bermondt-Avalov. Later, the palace became property of the Latvian Republic, and major reconstruction and restoration started. The new Jelgava Academy of Agriculture was established in the palace, opening in autumn 1939.

From 1941 until summer of 1944, the palace was a residence of Gebietskommissar von Mitau Walter von Medem. The palace suffered heavy damage in World War II, during battles for Jelgava in the summer of 1944. Like many other historical buildings in Jelgava, the palace was almost completely destroyed during heavy shelling and street fighting. The exterior of the palace was restored between 1956 and 1964, but not the interior. After restoration, the Latvia Academy of Agriculture (now the Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies) was again located in the palace; today it houses university administration and three faculties.

Architecture
Jelgava Palace is not considered one of Rastrelli's better works. Critics note the dull facade design lacking rhythmic diversity and plastic richness which characterized Rastrelli's works in Empress Elizabeth's period. Also, atypically for Rastrelli, the palace did not feature a garden; nor was the parade yard originally closed, instead facing the urban panorama of Jelgava.

Originally, the palace consisted of two wings connected to the main building forming a U-shape. In 1937 a fourth building was added by Eižens Laube effectively closing the perimeter.

Features of special historical significance include the burial vault of the Dukes of Courland in the south-east basement. All Dukes of Courland from the Houses of Kettler and Biron were buried there between 1569 and 1791. The rooms contain 21 sarcophagi and nine wooden coffins. The crypt was relocated to the palace in 1819.
en.wikipedia.org

Jelgava Palace

Code: V-1072-20
Author: Aivars Gulbis
Photo taken on June 13, 2020
FREE 1000 x 667 px
72 dpi
214 KB
S 1748 x 1165 px
14.8 x 9.87 cm / 300 dpi
MB
M 3000 x 2000 px
25.4 x 16.93 cm / 300 dpi
L 6000 x 4000 px
50.8 x 33.87 cm / 300 dpi
19.2 MB
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